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Meadowlands Marsh Hawks Team Page
Help us reach our team goal:
$5,000

$1,854 raised so far,   $3,146 to go!


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Make a Pledge
Your can pledge per-species (we expect 150 species) or a fixed amount.
Team Members
Michael Newhouse
Christopher Takacs
Mike Wolfe
Zachary Batren
Donor Roll
Leslie Roche
$300.00


Sarah Garrison
$250.00


Natalie Gregorio
$200.00


Rhonda Brown
$100.00


Linda Mullaney
$100.00


Dennis Cheeseman
$100.00


Denise Farrell
$100.00


Janet Christman
$50.00


Roy Woodford
$50.00


Fund Raising Jar Gregorio
$50.00


George Roussey
$50.00


Kim Mendillo
$50.00


Susan Elbin
$50.00


Ravi Potluri
$25.00


Michael Newhouse
$25.00


Lila and Nora Baird
$25.00


Nellie Tsipoura
$25.00


Christopher Takacs
$25.00


Margaret Southwell
$25.00


Judi Batren
$25.00


Dave Tompkins
$25.00


Vivian Newhouse
$25.00


Taj Schottland
$25.00


Jim Wright
$25.00


Christopher Magarelli
$10.00


Robert Hergenrother
$10.00


Christopher Magarelli
$5.00



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A new era of technology has been added to the NJ Audubon/NYC Audubon Harbor Herons foraging surveys. For the past several years, dedicated Citizen Science volunteers have spent hundreds of hours collecting data on Harbor Heron foraging locations in NYC and NJ. Now two of our birds are part of a larger study being done by scientists at Lenoir-Rhyne University (Dr. John Brzorad) and Friends University (Dr. Alan Maccarone).

On June 25-26, two adult great egrets were captured at Wolf’s Pond, Staten Island, and fitted with solar powered GPS/GSM transmitters. The two birds, Clarence and Edward, have been ‘adopted’ by the citizen scientists (Edward) and local classrooms on Staten Island (New Dorp HS and St. Clare’s School; Clare).

New Jersey Audubon wants to add more transmitters and birds so additional classrooms get a chance to learn about bird behavior and migration. Please support our team in trying to raise funds so more children get to follow birds like Edward and Clarence.

Bird migration is an amazing event and we can always learn more about the journey birds have every spring and fall. Here is the path of Edward the Egret from his breeding grounds to his wintering area and back again. Pay particular attention to his return flight, 19 hours non-stop. All I have to say is that I would have a hard time doing this in an airplane!

To find out locations of Edward and Clarence please visit this link:

https://www.movebank.org/panel_embedded_movebank_webapp?gwt_fragment=page%253Dsearch_map_linked%252CindividualIds%253D78588036%252B78588007%252Clat%253D40.51562620688839%252Clon%253D-74.19166088104248%252Cz%253D16.

The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of NJ Audubon.
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